Roslin Macdonald
About Author
June 5, 2020
 in 
Anxiety/Depression

Facing Fear

Fear can be both our enemy or our friend.  It can in the blink of an eye rob us of clarity and discrimination. It can thrust us into panic and confusion.  It has the power to deceive and disable us and yet fear is not all that it appears to be. In fact the greatest fear is the fear offear itself.  This is the real enemy because it divorces us from the truth and from our potential.

When we remove the blindfold of fear from our eyes we are able to see that fear is not the enemy at all, it is our perception of fear that is the problem.

Fear means no harm; it merely comes to alert us, to warn us.  It has no intention or desire to hurt us.  It is a protective drive that seeks to steer us away from that which can harm us.  Whenwe see fear in this way we are able to form a friendship with it. We stop battling against it as we come to realise it is not the enemy at all.

We waste so much time and energy misunderstanding fear.  Facing fear is not as scary as it sounds once you recognise fear as a friend, a messenger bringing some beneficial insight to our attention, we should readily go to meet it.

As we begin to see fear as a friend we are able to look into the eyes of those things we have run from and see them in a very different light.

We have nothing to fear except the fear of fear itself and once we let that go we can look closely and carefully at those things we have avoided and see them all differently.  We see that we have nothing to fear, we stop running away and move towards experiences realising they are all opportunities, opportunities to grow.

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